Aug 282012
 

If you have read other posts on this blog, you may realize that I am a fan of Silverlight. I thought (and still do think) that with that technology Microsoft really hit a sweet spot with simplicity, ease of deployment, usability, and developer productivity. This is especially true for those devs working on internal, line-of-business apps, of which there are quite a few. And internal LOB apps have been Microsoft’s bread and butter for devs tools for a long time with products like VB, WinForms, etc. If an organization of any significant size runs on top of Windows, then most likely it employs a team of developers working on these technologies.

But lately, with Microsoft’s shift in focus toward ASP.NET MVC, jQuery, HTML 5 and other cutting-edge web standards, the amount of things the average developer has to care about has exploded. Has this strategy alienated the Dark Matter Developers that have supported Microsoft for so long? And does Microsoft have the agility, expertise, and community support to compete in the world of “real” websites like Twitter and Google? Are they putting too much energy toward the 1% of top developers and ignoring the 99% that just want a simple dev stack that will be stable for 10 years? Continue reading »

Mar 202011
 

This is part two in a series of articles on .NET architecture. You can start here for the introduction and table of contents. This post will focus on the overarching principles I’ve developed when tackling application architecture. The focus of this post is not on individual technologies (except when used as examples), but on general rules of thumb that I use to help guide me when making architectural decisions.

I consider these to be the axioms of my architectural philosophy. And like axioms in philosophy, if you disagree with any of these foundational principles, you will most likely disagree with a lot of the conclusions I draw based on them. But that’s okay – no matter what principles you hold, someone will always disagree. :-) Continue reading »